Sensing Semana Santa: Holy Week in Southern Spain, Jerez de la Frontera (Photo Feature)

“In the south, we need to touch” – this is how the Spanish tradition of Semana Santa was explained to me by Manuel, council representative of Defensión brotherhood, a religious association which for over fifty years has participated in the Holy Week processions of Jerez de la Frontera, Spain. Commemorating the final days of Christ, the Semana Santa is an assault on your eyes and ears, and a jig-saw puzzle for your head. Continue reading “Sensing Semana Santa: Holy Week in Southern Spain, Jerez de la Frontera (Photo Feature)”

The Grape, the Olive, and the Orange: Zahara de la Sierra, Andalusia (Photo Story)

The Holy Trinity of Andalusian cuisine and culture – the grape, the olive, and the orange – has long had a home at Zahara de la Sierra, Cadiz, perched up on the northern borderline of what is probably the province’s single most important natural asset: the Sierra de Grazalema Natural Park. I went there to Zahara to take a walk around and up and down. Continue reading “The Grape, the Olive, and the Orange: Zahara de la Sierra, Andalusia (Photo Story)”

Freewheeling through Rural Andalusia: The Via Verde of Seville (Photo Story)

Not far north of Seville, there is a track winding back through the northern slopes of Andalusia, through the Sierra Morena, a gorgeous corrugated mountain range covered in olive and oak trees under which graze pigs, sheep and goat. The track follows and old railway line built a century ago to service an iron mine at the end of the line. Mostly dead straight and mostly an easy incline, the Via Verde is the perfect way to see Andalusia by bike. I followed its twenty or so kilometres up and back to see what I could see. Continue reading “Freewheeling through Rural Andalusia: The Via Verde of Seville (Photo Story)”

Photo Report: Thousands March in Jerez to Defend Public Healthcare

Often said to be a conservative city, Jerez de la Frontera took to the street on mass this weekend to defend a public, quality healthcare system. According to police estimates, around 5,000 people streamed into the central plaza to listen to the movement’s leader, Joaquín Fernández, decry the cuts and negligence which left his wife waiting injured on a footpath for some 45 minutes before being attended to after being hit by a motorcycle.

Continue reading “Photo Report: Thousands March in Jerez to Defend Public Healthcare”

Festival of the…Sea Urchin! – Photo Report on Cadiz’s ‘Erizada’

Of all countries on earth, Spain, perhaps, is that which has the most festivals and fiestas per capita. An exhaustive list of its festivals would run into the hundreds,  possibly thousands, though there always seems to pop up another one which you hadn’t yet heard of. Springing forth from the community itself, with few rules and regulations, little respect for traffic flow, and a socially diverse crowd of old and young, these parties are truly organic, civic celebrations. Continue reading “Festival of the…Sea Urchin! – Photo Report on Cadiz’s ‘Erizada’”

A Spanish Epiphany: Gorilla Culo, Inflatable Snake and Adults Turning into Children (Photo Story)

Christmas in Spain is celebrated twice per year; first on Christmas Eve, and then again on Reyes – Three Kings Day, or the Epiphany – when children traditionally receive gifts delivered to them from bearded sorcerers of the Far East. Reyes Eve is celebrated throughout Spain with a Cabalgata de Reyes, a parade in which sweets are tossed by the kings’ retinues atop floats onto the onlookers below. It is said that Reyes is a children’s event, but at a Reyes parade adults briefly turn into children again. Continue reading “A Spanish Epiphany: Gorilla Culo, Inflatable Snake and Adults Turning into Children (Photo Story)”

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